Tag Archives: Portland

School Vacation – A week of chasing stories, ghosts, and a land not forgotten

For the next seven days, my wife and I are going to travel through the countryside of Ireland and try to recharge the batteries. For my students who might be reading this, yes, that’s considered a euphemism for the infirmities of passing well into the fifth decade of life.

Great storytelling from debut novelist

SACO – One of the joys of joining the writing community in Maine is getting to know other writers, publishers, and editors. Each person seems to have their own take on what makes them successful and what might have helped them in their writing careers, but above all else, they seem to share a sometimes […]

Winter Warriors – we’re all a little crazy

W hen I think of Maine winter activities, the snow, the cold, and short winter days dominate the ideas that come to mind. I see images of snowshoeing, downhill and cross-country skiing, skating, hockey, and even ice fishing. For whatever reason, I don’t think about running and road races. So what did I do? I […]

Runners from Portland to Boston take to the streets in support

PORTLAND/BOSTON – With little fanfare, runners throughout Maine and Massachusetts have taken to the streets as an act of compassion and support for one another and the victims of Monday’s senseless bombings. John Rogers and the people at the Maine Running Company sent out a simple face book message. A little more than 24 hours […]

Presidents’ Day – Maine’s connection to the first commander in chief

Even as the day slips past, Mainers are reminded the history of their state reaches back to colonial days and the founding fathers. George Washington died in December 1799 and as the country mourned the passing of a great leader, 18-year-old Elizabeth (Eliza) Wadsworth, from Portland, wrote to her father hoping he would send her […]

Black history … some local stories you never knew

PORTLAND – One of the most overlooked monuments to black history in America, the Abyssinian Meetinghouse, was one of the nation’s first black churches, a station on the underground railroad and a platform for famous abolitionists. Built in 1827 by black seamen in the merchant and coastal ferry fleet, it started to decline after the […]